Feed the Hungary as Christ Calls You

Food Donations for Food Shelf

On the first weekend of each month, our parish collects food for the Winona Volunteer Services food shelf. Please remember to bring your nonperishable food and monetary (marked WVS) donations to Mass this weekend July 4-5, 2015.

Items most needed are canned fruits and juices, canned meats, rice and pasta, complete baking mixes, peanut butter, cereal, and canned soups and stews. Low salt and low sugar items are also needed for those with restrictive diets visiting the food shelf.


Christ calls us to help those in need. Donate and help God's Children in His name. 

For I was hungry and you gave me something to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you invited me in, I needed clothes and you clothed me, I was sick and you looked after me, I was in prison and you came to visit me.’

“Then the righteous will answer him, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, or thirsty and give you something to drink? When did we see you a stranger and invite you in, or needing clothes and clothe you? When did we see you sick or in prison and go to visit you?’

“The King will reply, ‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me.’ - Matthew 25:35-40 

FORTNIGHT FOR FREEDOM Day 10, June 30th, 2015

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Vatican II document Declaration on Religious Liberty (Dignitatis Humanae, Of Human Dignity). These reflections and articles are intended for daily use during the Fortnight for Freedom, and the readings and the questions that follow can be used for
group discussion or for personal reflection.


The theme of this year's Fortnight will focus on the "freedom to bear witness" to the truth of the Gospel.  The Fortnight for Freedom: Freedom to Bear Witness will take place from June 21 to July 4.

"Finally, government is to see to it that the equality of citizens before the law, which is itself an element of the common welfare, is never violated for religious reasons whether openly or covertly. Nor is there to be discrimination among citizens. It follows that a wrong is done when government imposes upon its people, by force or fear or other means, the profession or repudiation of any religion, or when it hinders men from joining or leaving a religious body. All the more is it a violation of the will of God and of the sacred rights of the person and the family of nations, when force is brought to bear in any way in order to destroy or repress religion, either in the whole of mankind or in a particular country or in a specific community."
- Declaration on Religious Liberty (Dignitatis Humanae), no. 6 December 7, 1965

Reflection for Day Ten
Because all human beings possess equal dignity, value, and worth, the government is to ensure that this equality is maintained both for the good of the individual and for the good of society as a whole. This equality specifically should not be violated on religious grounds. Each religious body and the members of that body have equal rights to religious liberty. This equality demands that there be no discrimination based upon one’s religious beliefs. The Council Fathers now stress that, based upon this equality among its citizens, no government is permitted to impose in any way “the profession or repudiation of any religion.” Such an imposition is a violation of the right to be true to one’s conscience. Because of the freedom of conscience, the government is also not permitted to deny a person the right to join or leave a religious body. The government has no right to stipulate what a person can or cannot believe. If the above is true, then the Council states that it is all the more wrong when “force is brought to bear in any way in order to destroy or repress religion.” This not only applies to governments but also to religious bodies themselves. No religious body is permitted to harass or seek to eliminate another religious group. Within our contemporary world, where is religious equality denied or religious discrimination tolerated? Are there instances where one religion violates the rights of other religions?

FORTNIGHT FOR FREEDOM Day 9, June 29th, 2015

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Vatican II document Declaration on Religious Liberty (Dignitatis Humanae, Of Human Dignity). These reflections and articles are intended for daily use during the Fortnight for Freedom, and the readings and the questions that follow can be used for group discussion or for personal reflection.



The theme of this year's Fortnight will focus on the "freedom to bear witness" to the truth of the Gospel.  The Fortnight for Freedom: Freedom to Bear Witness will take place from June 21 to July 4.

"The protection and promotion of the inviolable rights of man ranks among the essential duties of government. Therefore, government is to assume the safeguard of the religious freedom of all its citizens, in an effective manner, by just laws and by other appropriate means. Government is also to help create conditions favorable to the fostering of religious life, in order that the people may be truly enabled to exercise their religious rights and to fulfill their religious duties, and also in order that society itself may profit by the moral qualities of justice and peace which have their origin in men’s faithfulness to God and to His holy will." 
- Declaration on Religious Liberty (Dignitatis Humanae), no. 6 December 7, 1965

Reflection for Day Nine 
Once again, the Council Fathers turn to what they consider a very important issue. It is not simply that governments should not deny or impede the religious freedom of their citizens, it is also of the utmost importance that they positively, through just laws, be the guardians of religious freedom, so that no constituency—religious or secular—within society would seek to undermine the religious freedom of all. While few today would consider this, the next point that the Council Fathers make is also very significant. Governments should actually “help create conditions favorable to the fostering of religious life.” While governments do not control religions, they should recognize their value and so promote their well-being. This allows all religious bodies and their members to exercise their religious rights and “fulfill their religious duties.” The government’s fostering the religious life of its citizens not only benefits those citizens but also, the Council states, contributes to the good of society as a whole. It helps society grow in its understanding and implementation of what contributes to justice and peace. This justice and peace find their origin in God, who desires the good of all. How do governments protect and promote the religious life of their citizens? Do governments take this into consideration today? In the U.S., how does the government foster religious life while respecting the principle of separation of church and state?

FORTNIGHT FOR FREEDOM Day 8, June 28th, 2015

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Vatican II document Declaration on Religious Liberty (Dignitatis Humanae, Of Human Dignity). These reflections and articles are intended for daily use during the Fortnight for Freedom, and the readings and the questions that follow can be used for group discussion or for personal reflection.


The theme of this year's Fortnight will focus on the "freedom to bear witness" to the truth of the Gospel.  The Fortnight for Freedom: Freedom to Bear Witness will take place from June 21 to July 4.

"Since the family is a society in its own original right, it has the right freely to live its own domestic religious life under the guidance of parents. Parents, moreover, have the right to determine, in accordance with their own religious beliefs, the kind of religious education that their children are to receive. Government, in consequence, must acknowledge the right of parents to make a genuinely free choice of schools and of other means of education. The use of this freedom of choice is not to be made a reason for imposing unjust burdens on parents, whether directly or indirectly. Besides, the rights of parents are violated if their children are forced to attend lessons or instructions which are not in agreement with their religious beliefs. The same is true if a single system of education, from which all religious formation is excluded, is imposed upon all." 
- Declaration on Religious Liberty (Dignitatis Humanae), no. 5 December 7, 1965

Reflection for Day Eight
The Council Fathers now address the religious freedom that is enjoyed by the family. Families have the right to live out their faith within the family. Moreover, parents have a natural right to religiously guide their families. They are the ones who have primary responsibility for the care and education of their children, and this is especially true of the religious education of their children. Thus, while parents are primarily responsible for the religious education, they are also free to choose the kind of religious education their children receive. From within the Catholic tradition, Vatican II stated that the family is a “domestic church,” that is, it is within the family that children are first taught the Gospel, are taught to pray and to keep the Commandments. Together the members of a family live out the Gospel life of love. In keeping with this, the Council states that parents must be free to choose their children’s schooling. The exercise of this freedom should not be the cause of undue financial burdens upon the family. Likewise, children should not be forced to attend instruction that is contrary to the religious belief of their families. Lastly, if there is only one form of education within a country, this does not mean that all religious instruction should be forbidden. Accommodation is to be made. What we see here is the Church ardently wanting to assure a broad and extensive scope for families to live out their faith as families, and this extends to the education of children. Why is the above important for parents and their families? Are the above aspects of domestic religious freedom jeopardized today?

FORTNIGHT FOR FREEDOM Day 7, June 27th, 2015

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Vatican II document Declaration on Religious Liberty (Dignitatis Humanae, Of Human Dignity). These reflections and articles are intended for daily use during the Fortnight for Freedom, and the readings and the questions that follow can be used for group discussion or for personal reflection.


The theme of this year's Fortnight will focus on the "freedom to bear witness" to the truth of the Gospel.  The Fortnight for Freedom: Freedom to Bear Witness will take place from June 21 to July 4.

"Religious bodies also have the right not to be hindered in their public teaching and witness to their faith, whether by the spoken or by the written word. However, in spreading religious faith and in introducing religious practices, everyone ought at all times to refrain from any manner of action which might seem to carry a hint of coercion or of a kind of persuasion that would be dishonorable or unworthy, especially when dealing with poor or uneducated people. Such a manner of action would have to be considered an abuse of one’s own right and a violation of the rights of others. In addition, it comes within the meaning of religious freedom that religious bodies should not be prohibited from freely undertaking to show the special value of their doctrine in what concerns the organization of society and the inspiration of the whole of human activity. Finally, the social nature of man and the very nature of religion afford the foundation of the right of men freely to hold meetings and to establish educational, cultural, charitable, and social organizations, under the impulse of their own religious sense." 
- Declaration on Religious Liberty (Dignitatis Humanae), no. 4 December 7, 1965

Reflection for Day Seven 
While the Council Fathers insist that religious bodies must be free to teach and bear witness to their faith, they equally stress that this freedom must never be abused. It is not only governments that can deny their freedom; in attempting to spread their own beliefs, religions should not force others, physically or psychologically, to convert. Rather, each person’s dignity and freedom must be maintained. The accepting of religious beliefs must be an act of freedom, otherwise it is done not because it is believed to be true but rather out of fear and force. The right to profess and proclaim one’s own faith cannot violate the same right of another. That being said, religious bodies should be free to provide reasons as to why their beliefs are true and why it would be of value for others to believe what they believe. They should also be free to address how their beliefs contribute to the good of society. What contemporary examples are there of religious bodies using coercion in an attempt to spread their faith or hindering others from exercising their faith? What contributions does the Catholic Church make to society and culture?

Fr. Jonathan's Ordination Highlights (video)

The parishioners, mentors, friends and family of Father Jonathan, in attendance at Cathedral of the Sacred Heart for his Ordination, witnessed the writing of history. A new priest has been named for God's Church and for His people. Father Jonathan will be in our prayers as he begins his first assignment as the Associate Pastor of the Cathedral/St. Casimir Cluster. Praise be to God for Father Jonathan.

Click here to view the highlights from Father Jonathan Fasnacht's ordination on June 19th, 2015 in a video from the Diocese of Winona.


FORTNIGHT FOR FREEDOM Day 6, June 26th, 2015

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Vatican II document Declaration on Religious Liberty (Dignitatis Humanae, Of Human Dignity). These reflections and articles are intended for daily use during the Fortnight for Freedom, and the readings and the questions that follow can be used for group discussion or for personal reflection.



The theme of this year's Fortnight will focus on the "freedom to bear witness" to the truth of the Gospel.  The Fortnight for Freedom: Freedom to Bear Witness will take place from June 21 to July 4.

"The freedom or immunity from coercion in matters religious which is the endowment of persons as individuals is also to be recognized as their right when they act in community. Religious bodies are a requirement of the social nature both of man and of religion itself. Provided the just requirements of public order are observed, religious bodies rightfully claim freedom in order that they may govern themselves according to their own norms, honor the Supreme Being in public worship, assist their members in the practice of the religious life, strengthen them by instruction, and promote institutions in which they may join together for the purpose of ordering their lives in accordance with their religious principles. Religious bodies also have the right not to be hindered, either by legal measures or by administrative action on the part of government, in the selection, training, appointment, and transferral of their own ministers, in communicating with religious authorities and communities abroad, in erecting buildings for religious purposes, and in the acquisition and use of suitable funds or properties." 
- Declaration on Religious Liberty (Dignitatis Humanae), no. 4 December 7, 1965

Reflection for Day Six
The Council once more addresses the public nature of religious belief. Religious communities have a right to act as a community of faith, for this is inherent within the social nature of human beings and religious belief itself. Provided that the just civil and religious rights of others are not transgressed, religious bodies must possess the freedom to live out publicly what they believe. They must be free to gather for worship, to instruct their members, and to develop institutions that further the religious life of their members. From within the Catholic tradition this would include religious institutes and orders, schools, fraternities and sodalities, prayer groups, and Bible study groups. Likewise, religious bodies must be free to appoint and train their own ministers. For Catholics, that means the Church’s freedom at least to appoint bishops and ordain priests. It also means that Catholics are free to be loyal to their church and its leaders while also being loyal to their country and its leaders. Religious bodies should also be free to govern themselves financially. Consider examples in contemporary life where governments—federal, state, or local—fail to respect the above rights? What is the relationship between the religious freedom of individuals and institutions?

FORTNIGHT FOR FREEDOM Day 5, June 25th, 2015

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Vatican II document Declaration on Religious Liberty (Dignitatis Humanae, Of Human Dignity). These reflections and articles are intended for daily use during the Fortnight for Freedom, and the readings and the questions that follow can be used for group discussion or for personal reflection.


The theme of this year's Fortnight will focus on the "freedom to bear witness" to the truth of the Gospel.  The Fortnight for Freedom: Freedom to Bear Witness will take place from June 21 to July 4.

"There is a further consideration. The religious acts whereby men, in private and in public and out of a sense of personal conviction, direct their lives to God transcend by their very nature the order of terrestrial and temporal affairs. Government, therefore, ought indeed to take account of the religious life of the people and show it favor, since the function of government is to make provision for the common welfare. However, it would clearly transgress the limits set to its power were it to presume to direct or inhibit acts that are religious." 

- Declaration on Religious Liberty (Dignitatis Humanae), no. 3 December 7, 1965

Reflection for Day Five 
What the Council Fathers teach in this short paragraph is very important. They previously stated that governments should not deny religious liberty. Here they state what governments should positively do with regards to religion. Since people, through their religious beliefs, direct their lives toward God, governments are positively to take this into account. Not only should governments not hinder religious life, they should also “show it favor.” Since religious belief is a good within culture and society, governments should foster and aid the good that religion brings to the commonwealth. This does not mean that a government should favor one religion over another or that it should attempt to direct what religions should believe or do. Rather, governments are to create an environment in which religious life flourishes for the good of all. In providing such an environment where religious life prospers, governments contribute to the good of individuals as well as to the good of society as a whole. How does religion contribute to the good of society? In what ways might it hinder the good of society? Do contemporary Western governments view religion in a positive or negative light? How can governments today foster or aid the good of religious belief?

FORTNIGHT FOR FREEDOM Day 4, June 24th, 2015

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Vatican II document Declaration on Religious Liberty (Dignitatis Humanae, Of Human Dignity). These reflections and articles are intended for daily use
during the Fortnight for Freedom, and the readings and the questions that follow can be used for group discussion or for personal reflection.

The theme of this year's Fortnight will focus on the "freedom to bear witness" to the truth of the Gospel.  The Fortnight for Freedom: Freedom to Bear Witness will take place from June 21 to July 4.

"On his part, man perceives and acknowledges the imperatives of the divine law through the mediation of conscience. In all his activity a man is bound to follow his conscience faithfully, in order that he may come to God, for whom he was created. It follows that he is not to be forced to act in a manner contrary to his conscience. Nor, on the other hand, is he to be restrained from acting in accordance with his conscience, especially in matters religious. For, of its very nature, the exercise of religion consists before all else in those internal, voluntary, and free acts whereby man sets the course of life directly toward God. No merely human power can either command or prohibit acts of this kind. However, the social nature of man itself requires that he should give external expression to his internal acts of religion; that he should participate with others in matters religious; that he should profess his religion in community. Injury, therefore, is done to the human person and to the very order established by God for human life, if the free exercise of religion is denied in society when the just requirements of public order do not so require." 
 - Declaration on Religious Liberty (Dignitatis Humanae), no. 3 December 7, 1965 

Reflection for Day Four 
It is through their consciences that human beings perceive the requirements of the divine law. Human beings must follow faithfully their conscience if they are to grow in their knowledge of and union with God. Again, the Council restates that, because of this, no one should either be forced to act contrary to his or her conscience or be forbidden to act in accordance with his or her conscience. This is especially the case when it involves one’s religious beliefs. The Council Fathers note that this applies not only to one’s internal private religious acts but also to public communal religious acts. Human beings hold religious beliefs within a community of like-minded believers and so have the right to publicly live out their beliefs. To forbid the just and proper public expressions of religious belief would be contrary to the order that God has established for human beings as social and religious beings. The Council Fathers want to ensure that religious liberty is understood to be both private and public. It cannot be limited to what takes places in houses of worship. Rather, since religion is by its nature a social phenomenon, its presence within the broader society and culture should not be hindered or forbidden. In what ways is religion being reduced to the merely personal and private? Why should religion have a voice in the public square?

Young at Heart Sloppy Joe Luncheon (7/2)

Young at Heart will meet on July 2nd.


12:10 mass, followed by lunch.

Menu: Sloppy Joes, potato salad, baked beans, relish tray with dip, and cake. 

Msgr. Colletti will provide musical entertainment. 

Call Marge at 454-3433 no later than June 29th for reservations. Cost is $3.00. 

All are welcome. 

FORTNIGHT FOR FREEDOM Day 3, June 23rd, 2015

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Vatican II document Declaration on Religious Liberty (Dignitatis Humanae, Of Human Dignity). These reflections and articles are intended for daily use during the Fortnight for Freedom, and the readings and the questions that follow can be used for group discussion or for personal reflection.

The theme of this year's Fortnight will focus on the "freedom to bear witness" to the truth of the Gospel.  The Fortnight for Freedom: Freedom to Bear Witness will take place from June 21 to July 4.

"Further light is shed on the subject if one considers that the highest norm of human life is the divine law—eternal, objective, and universal—whereby God orders, directs, and governs the entire universe and all the ways of human community, by a plan conceived in wisdom and love. Man has been made by God to participate in this law, with the result that, under the gentle disposition of divine Providence, he can come to perceive ever increasingly the unchanging truth. Hence every man has the duty, and therefore the right, to seek the truth in matters religious, in order that he may with prudence form for himself right and true judgments of conscience, with the use of all suitable means. Truth, however, is to be sought after in a manner proper to the dignity of the human person and his social nature. The inquiry is to be free, carried on with the aid of teaching or instruction, communication, and dialogue. In the course of these, men explain to one another the truth they have discovered, or think they have discovered, in order thus to assist one another in the quest for truth. Moreover, as the truth is discovered, it is by a personal assent that men are to adhere to it."

Declaration on Religious Liberty (Dignitatis Humanae), no. 3 December 7, 1965

Reflection for Day ThreeGod is the author of all truth and all good. All of what is true and good in our world and cosmos finds its source in God, the Creator of all. Moreover, what is true and good about ourselves as human beings finds its source in God in that he created us in his image and likeness. Thus, for the Council Fathers, all that exists is in conformity with the divine law, the providential plan of God. Because of this, the Council emphasizes that truth must be “sought after in a manner proper to the dignity of the human person and his social nature.” This means that human beings must be free to seek the truth. However, human beings do not seek the truth as isolated individuals. The search for the truth is common to all, and so all share in the finding of truth and all share in the receiving of truth from others. Because the search for truth, the finding of truth, and the sharing of truth is a social exercise, human beings must not only be free to search for truth in the hope of finding it, they must also be free to communicate and discuss together the truth they believe they have found. It is through our free assent that we each personally lay hold of the truth. What are the contemporary means of seeking, finding, and sharing truth? In what ways can this freedom to seek, to find, and to share be inhibited?

FORTNIGHT FOR FREEDOM Day 2 June 22, 2015

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Vatican II document Declaration on Religious Liberty (Dignitatis Humanae, Of Human Dignity). These reflections and articles are intended for daily use during the Fortnight for Freedom, and the readings and the questions that follow can be used for group discussion or for personal reflection.

The theme of this year's Fortnight will focus on the "freedom to bear witness" to the truth of the Gospel.  The Fortnight for Freedom: Freedom to Bear Witness will take place from June 21 to July 4.

"It is in accordance with their dignity as persons— that is, being endowed with reason and free will and therefore privileged to bear personal responsibility— that all men should be at once impelled by nature and also bound by a moral obligation to seek the truth, especially religious truth. They are also bound to adhere to the truth, once it is known, and to order their whole lives in accord with the demands of truth. However, men cannot discharge these obligations in a manner in keeping with their own nature unless they enjoy immunity from external coercion as well as psychological freedom. Therefore, the right to religious freedom has its foundation, not in the subjective disposition of the person, but in his very nature. In consequence, the right to this immunity continues to exist even in those who do not live up to their obligation of seeking the truth and adhering to it. Nor is the exercise of this right to be impeded, provided that the just requirements of public order are observed." 
- Declaration on Religious Liberty (Dignitatis Humanae), no. 2 December 7, 1965

Reflection for Day Two
The Council Fathers note that it is precisely because human beings are “endowed with reason and free will” that they naturally seek what is true and good and also, then, have “a moral obligation” to search for the truth. This is especially the case of seeking religious truth. Moreover, the truth they believe they have come to know binds them to that truth. Even if the “truth” they believe is not actually true, yet, because they believe it is true, they are bound to follow their conscience. As long as what they believe does not infringe the just rights of others, they cannot be coerced into giving up or changing what they believe. Moreover, the Council states that in order for human beings to fulfill their obligation to seek the truth and live by it, they must be free to do so. No one or no authority is to force them to believe something to which they themselves have not freely given their consent.

Reflections for the FORTNIGHT FOR FREEDOM Day 1 June 21, 2015

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Vatican II document Declaration on Religious Liberty (Dignitatis Humanae, Of Human Dignity). These reflections and articles are intended for daily use during the Fortnight for Freedom, and the readings and the questions that follow can be used for group discussion or for personal reflection.

The theme of this year's Fortnight will focus on the "freedom to bear witness" to the truth of the Gospel. The Fortnight for Freedom: Freedom to Bear Witness will take place from June 21 to July 4.

"The Vatican Synod declares that the human person has a right to religious freedom. This freedom means that all men are to be immune from coercion on the part of individuals or of social groups and of any human power, in such wise that in matters religious no one is to be forced to act in a manner  contrary to his own beliefs. Nor is anyone to be restrained from acting in accordance with his own beliefs, whether privately or publically, whether alone or in association with others, within due limits. The Synod further declares that the right to religious freedom has its foundation in the very dignity of the human person, as this dignity is known through the revealed Word of God and by reason itself. This right of the human person to religious freedom is to be recognized in the constitutional law whereby society is governed. Thus it is to become a civil right." 

-Declaration on Religious Liberty (Dignitatis Humanae), no. 2 December 7, 1965

Reflection for Day One
In the opening chapter of Declaration on Religious Liberty, the Council Fathers at Vatican II forthrightly declared that “the human person has a right to religious freedom.” This right is founded upon the intrinsic dignity of the human person. From God’s revelation we know that the dignity of human beings resides in their being created in the image and likeness of God
(Gn 1:27). Like God we are intelligent beings with free will. Because of this we can know the truth and perform God-like actions, such as being loving, kind, forgiving, etc. Reason itself, in knowing what a human being is, confirms that we possess a dignity and worth that exceeds the rest of creation and that cannot be violated, but rather needs to be protected and fostered.
 What human beings believe concerning God is of supreme importance. Religious belief lies at the very center of who we are in relation to what is most central and cherished in our lives. Therefore, the Council insists that the religious convictions of individuals or groups should never be coerced but must be held freely, protected by a civil constitutional right.

Congratulations to Fr. Jonathan Fasnacht!

The Ordination of Jonathan Joseph Fasnacht (6/19) was a beautiful celebration of the gift of priesthood by His Excellency Most Rev. John M. Quinn, Bishop of Winona.  And Bishop Quinn announced the good news that Fr. Jonathan will be assigned as Parochial Vicar of the Cathedral Cluster.  We welcome Fr. Jonathan back to the Cathedral, as he did his Pastoral semester with us a couple of years ago. Fr. Jonathan will begin his assignment on July 1, 2015.  We will welcome him to our parish cluster with receptions after all our Masses on the weekend of July 11-12,  as many might be away on the July 4th weekend.   Thank you to all who made this celebration so beautiful, from our liturgical ministers, our diocesan choir, the accompanists and brass ensemble, the seminarians who served and all those who organized and served the delicious dinner and the great hospitality throughout the day. 

-Rev. Msgr. Richard M. Colletti


Rectory Office Closed 6/18-6/19

Cathedral of the Sacred Heart & St. Casimir Parish Office will be temporarily closed on Thursday June 18th, 2015 while the staff attends training workshops at Ministry Days. 
The Office will also be closed on Friday June 19th, 2015 while hosting Deacon Jonathon Fasnacht's Ordination. 

If you have any business to do with the Office, please complete it by 5pm Wednesday June 17th. We would be happy to help you. You may also call at 507-452-4770 or email at info@cathedralwinona.org. 
Regular open hours will resume on Monday June 22nd. Thank you for understanding. 

Fall Adult Faith Formation Study (Video)

Sign up for Fall Adult Faith Formation is open!
Nourish your faith by signing up for James: Pearls for Wise Living. Information and sign-up links are below for each session. 



Classes begin this Fall on September 22/23, 2015 and run through December 9/10, 2015. It will be offered in two sessions:
  • Tuesday evenings (6:30-8:30 p.m.) at St. Mary's Church in the Visitation Commons
  • Wednesday mornings (9:30-11:30 a.m.) at Cathedral of the Sacred Heart in the St. Augustine Room. 
Registration will end on September 8, 2015
Check out the video below to see a sample of the class DVD. To sign up or learn more, click here



Reflection on the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus (6/12)

Today, we celebrate the Solemnity of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus. 

Drawing on the day’s readings, Pope Francis described the Solemnity of the Most Sacred Heart as the “feast of love”: “Jesus wanted to show us his heart as the heart that loved so deeply. This is why we have this commemoration today, especially of God’s love. God loved us, he loved us with such great love. I am thinking of what St Ignatius told us.... He pointed out two criteria on love. The first: love is expressed more clearly in actions than in words. The second: there is greater love in giving than in receiving. These two criteria are like the pillars of true love: deeds, and the gift of self”.

 Explaining further, the Holy Father dwelt on the two aspects of God’s love which the day’s liturgy unveils to us. The first was God’s love symbolized by the shepherd: closeness. “The shepherd close to his flock, to his sheep that he knows one by one”. With regard to tenderness, the second aspect of God’s love for us, Pope Francis said: “the Lord loves us tenderly. The Lord knows the beautiful science of caresses — God’s tenderness. He does not love us with words. He approaches us, and in being close to us gives us his love with the deepest possible tenderness”.

However, “more difficult than loving God is letting ourselves be loved by him”, the Pope concluded. “Lord, I want to love you but teach me the difficult science, the difficult habit of letting myself be loved by you...”. Perhaps this is what we should pray for at Mass.

When we hear the name, “Most Sacred Heart of Jesus,” most of us probably think of a statue that appears in many of our churches: the image where Jesus stands with his heart, burning with joy and love for us, exposed to all. Many of us probably do not think any deeper about this statue, and yet we are called to more. Pope Francis said, “It is more difficult to let God love us than to love Him! The best way to love Him in return is to open our hearts and let Him love us.” Every time we see these statues we are reminded to open ourselves to the love of Christ and give ourselves completely to him as he does. He lays his heart open before us as an example of how to live our lives.

VBS: Register To Ensure Camp Materials

Camp Discovery ~ Jesus at Work Through Us

St. Mary’s Church/School
August 3-7, 2015        
9:00am-12:00pm
For children ages 4 through grade 6.

VBS has an exciting new format! Volunteers will focus on one area of planning as children rotate to the different fun and inspiring stations of Storytelling, Bible Challenge, Crafts, and Games. The same great music, Opening and Closing experience and snack time will make this the best VBS ever!  Please consider joining the team!
Adult and youth helpers are needed.

Click here for registration and volunteer forms. You may find printed copies of these forms at the parish entrances (St. Mary's, Cathedral, St. Casimir, St. Stanislaus, St. John's). 
Register ASAP to make sure your child gets their camp materials.

Salad Lunch Tomorrow (6/10)

The Annual Salad Luncheon is coming up. 
Held at Cathedral on June 10, 2015
Serving will be from 11 am - 1 pm in Holy Family Hall

Sponsored by the Catholic Daughters of the Americas Court #191 and the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart. Tickets available at the door. All are welcome! 

Egg Bake Breakfast (6/14)

Show your support for our youth and chaperons attending the National Catholic Youth Conference at an Egg Bake Breakfast. All are welcome.

Egg Bake Breakfast held
Sunday, June 14, 2015 
9:30-11:30 am 
St. Casimir Parish
Menu: Egg Bake, Fruit, Beverages

Free Will Donations will benefit the 14 youth and 3 chaperons attending NCYC from all five Winona Catholic Parishes. Please, come share fellowship and encouragement with these amazing brothers and sisters in Christ.

Virtus Training June 24th

We will be offering a Virtus session Wednesday, June 24th at 6:15 pm at the St. Stanislaus Kostka Basilica, in the church hall under the church space (enter through the west door). 

All parish volunteers are asked to attend one training session. Please register by going to our Safe Environment page and clicking on "Sign up for a Virtus Session"Registration is required before the training. If you have questions or do not have a computer, please contact the parish office and we'll be happy to help!

The Virtus program is designed to help volunteers and employees work together to create safe environments for children and vulnerable adults. While attending a Virtus session is part of the safe environment program requirement for volunteers and employees at Catholic parishes and schools, everyone is welcome to attend. 
Thank you for helping us keep our parishes, schools, and communities safe!

Reflection Video For Corpus Christi

As we reflect on Corpus Christi, we are reminded of the power and significance of the Eucharist. 

Click here to watch this video about Eucharist to help in your prayerful reflection on this weekend's readings for Corpus Christi.

Ordination of Jonathan Joseph Fasnacht (6/19)

With praise to the Triune God
The Diocese of Winona
announces the Ordination of 

Jonathan Joseph Fasnacht 

to the
ORDER OF THE PRESBYTERATE

through the imposition of hands 
and the invocation of the Holy Spirit

by His Excellency
Most Rev. John M. Quinn
Bishop of Winona

2 pm on Friday, June 19th, 2015
at 
The Cathedral of the Sacred Heart
360 Main Street
Winona, MN 55987

Reception to follow in the 
Cathedral Holy Family Hall

RSVP 
Office of the Bishop
PO Box 588
Winona, MN 55987

Help Wanted for Ordination Celebration (6/19)

The Diocese of Winona and the Cathedral parish staff need volunteers for Deacon Jonathan Fasnacht's Ordination on June 19th. Help is needed in the roles of:
  • Reception in the kitchen
  • Ushers/Greeters for both inside and outside
If you are interested in volunteering, please call the Cathedral parish office at 507-452-4770 or email Cathedral at info@cathedralwinona.org by Monday, June 15th. 

Dave VanVickle challenges us to go out. #ShareJesus


Have you ever wondered how to be more inclusive and inviting towards your peers and family in regards to your faith? Have you ever felt idle in your faith and need a new challenge to bolster your relationship with Christ?  

If you answered "yes" to any of these questions, then consider yourself called to read Dave VanVickle's challenge in his #ShareJesus reflection to go out. His reflection is helpful for brothers and sisters in Christ who would like some inspiration about how to share their faith. He invites us to open wide the doors of the Church to those in need, instead of treating it like a fort to hide within. He also offers easy tips for sharing faith over social media, with family, and other ways to go out and share the Good News.


We must go out.



Salad Luncheon Around The Corner (6/10)

The Annual Salad Luncheon is coming up. 
Held at Cathedral on June 10, 2015
Serving will be from 11 am - 1 pm in Holy Family Hall

Sponsored by the Catholic Daughters of the Americas Court #191 and the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart.
If you have not been contacted and would like to volunteer and/or bring a salad, please call Mary Donahue at (507) 452-3162.

Monthly Holy Hour for Life, Marriage & Religious Liberty (6/6)

The monthly Holy Hour of Prayer for Life, Marriage, and Religious Liberty will be held the first Saturday of the month so those who take part in the First Saturday Devotions can join us for the Holy Hour. 

Upcoming Holy Hours include June 6 and July 4 at 8:30 am (after the 8:00 am Mass) at the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart, 360 Main Street, Winona.  The Blessed Sacrament will be exposed and a beautiful rosary will be offered, along with prayer and reflection.  Gather in the Adoration Chapel. Everyone is welcome.


In a world where there is so much noise, so much bewilderment, there is a need for silent adoration of Jesus concealed in the Host. Be assiduous in the prayer of adoration…It is a source of comfort and light, particularly to those who are suffering.” - Pope Benedict XVI

Opening for Student Mission Trip Available

Attention High School Students:  
There is an opening for one more youth on the mission trip to Pine Ridge in South Dakota. 

If you are interested in this service opportunity, please contact Msgr. Colletti at Cathedral and St. Casimir, or Julie Walch at St. Mary’s Parish by Wednesday, June 3rd.  The trip is paid for, so this student would attend free of charge.

Jim Ballard's Party Pictures

On Sunday May 31, 2015, the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart family celebrated the 33 years that Jim Ballard has shared with us. About 200 friends and family came for the luncheon and open house down in Holy Family Hall where we had a wonderful gathering of fun, food, laughter, memories, and song. 

Thank you Jim and family for your steady, joyful dedication to music ministry in our parish. Thank you to the volunteers and guests who all made this celebration a wonderful memory. God bless! 

More pictures and a video of the Night Prayer (written by Jim and sung by the choir) can be found on the Facebook page. Click here to view them